Contributors

If you’re interested in knowing more about who’s contributed to the Urban Wildscapes book, click on a name to view the biographical information.
  • Chris Baines is an independent environmentalist and an award-winning broadcaster. He taught landscape design and management at postgraduate level until 1986. He was one of the founders of the UK’s first urban wildlife trusts at the end of the 1970s and his book How to Make a Wildlife Garden has been continuously in print for more than 25 years. He works with clients in the corporate sector and with central and local government and he is a national Vice President of the Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts. He works from home in inner city Wolverhampton.

  • Renée de Waal has worked since 2010 as a PhD researcher for the Landscape Architecture chair group of Wageningen University, focusing on renewable energy and landscape aesthetics. She graduated from Wageningen University in landscape architecture in 2009 and did both her internship and final thesis at the Internationale Bauausstellung (IBA) Fürst-Pückler-Land in Germany.

  • Nigel Dunnett is a Reader in Urban Horticulture, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield, and Director of the Green Roof Centre, University of Sheffield. His background lies within the fields of ecology, botany, horticulture, and garden and landscape design and his work integrates all these disciplines, with particular focus on green roofs, rain gardens, and naturalistic planting design. He developed the concept of ‘Pictorial Meadows’ and consults widely on naturalistic planting design, including for the London 2012 Olympic Park.

  • Bethan Evans is a Lecturer in the Department of Geography and Centre for Medical Humanities, Durham University. She has published in journals such as Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Antipode, Gender, Place and Culture, Geography Compass and Area. Her research interests are in children’s geographies, fat studies, embodiment and critical approaches to health. She is currently working on an Economic and Social Research Council project on the built environment in anti-obesity policy, and on a book entitled Fat Bodies, Fat Spaces: Critical Geographies of Obesity for the Antipode book series.

  • Catherine Heatherington is reading for a PhD with the Department of Landscape at the University of Sheffield, UK, whilst running her garden design practice in London. She loves the marshes and open skies of East Anglia, where she spent her childhood, and there are echoes of these muted landscapes in many of her gardens. Catherine’s fascination with wildscapes and dereliction can also be traced to those early years; exploring abandoned waterside sites and the rotting hulks of boats near her home.
  • Anna Jorgensen is a Lecturer in Landscape Architecture in the Department of Landscape, at the University of Sheffield, with a background in law, English literature and legal practice. She did her doctorate in the Department of Landscape on attitudes towards naturalistic woodland as a setting for housing and new settlements. Her current research focuses on the meanings, benefits and functions of urban green spaces, and especially wild urban landscapes. She has published articles on these themes in Landscape and Urban Planning and Landscape Research and is an Assistant Editor of Landscape Research.
  • Andreas Langer is an academically trained Engineer and studied Landscape Planning at the Technical University of Berlin (1978–1984). He was a research assistant at the Institute of Ecology, Technical University of Berlin (1988–1992), specializing in the phytosociology of ruderal vegetation. Since 1992 he has been a partner in the planning office ‘Planland- Planungsgruppe Landschaftsentwicklung’ with the main emphasis on Landscape and Environmental Planning and Landscape Architecture.

  • Lilli Licˇka is Head of the Institute of Landscape Architecture in the Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructural Sciences at the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences in Vienna, Austria. She has worked in professional practice in the Netherlands, and since 1991 has had her own practice, Koselicˇka, together with Ursula Kose in Vienna (www.koselicka.at). Completed work includes projects in housing, historic landscapes and parks, gardens and the urban public realm.

  • Helen Morse Palmer is a freelance artist. She devises and performs regularly with Station House Opera and is an Associate Member of the Live Art Garden Initiative. She has collaborated with John Deller to form the Lookoutpost Artists Group. Since 2008 she has also worked part time as a Community Artist for Epping Forest District Council. She is an active participant and workshop leader for the Blue Museum of Small Objects Academy of Tea Trolley Dancing and holds a black belt in Kung Fu. Helen holds a first class honours degree in Fine Art from Reading University, and an MA in Fine Art from Central Saint Martins. For further information visit Helen’s website.
  • Mattias Qviström holds an MSc (1998) and a doctorate (2003) in landscape architecture, both from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), with a dissertation on landscape theory and the materialization of modern ideas of time, speed and place within early twentieth century road planning. He has been an Associate Professor in landscape planning at SLU, Department of Landscape Architecture, since 2008. From 2004 he has led several research projects on urbanization and landscape changes at the urban fringe, focusing on the interplay between spatial planning and everyday life. His current research combine landscape and planning history in studies of urban sprawl and peri-urban landscapes.

  • Dougal Sheridan is a Lecturer in Architecture at the University of Ulster, a member of the Building Initiative Research Group (www.buildinginitiative.org), and Principle of LID Architecture (www.lid-architecture.net). His research publications focus on critical theory in relation to the appropriation of urban space, and publications and awards in practice relate to the use of landscape concepts and strategies in architecture and urbanism.

  • Catharine Ward Thompson is Research Professor of Landscape Architecture at Edinburgh College of Art and the University of Edinburgh. She is Director of OPENspace – the research centre for inclusive access to outdoor environments – based at Edinburgh College of Art and Heriot-Watt University and directs the College’s Landscape Architecture PhD programme. She leads a multidisciplinary research consortium entitled I’DGO (Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors), which focuses on quality of life for older people, in collaboration with the Universities of Salford, Warwick, Heriot-Watt and Edinburgh. She is a Fellow of the Landscape Institute and an Advisory Group member of SPARColl (the Scottish Physical Activity Research Collaboration) led by the University of Strathclyde.
  • Jon Binnie is a Reader in Human Geography at Manchester Metropolitan University. His research interests focus on the urban and transnational politics of sexualities. He is the author of The Globalization of Sexuality (Sage) and the co-author of The Sexual Citizen: Queer Politics and Beyond (Polity) and Pleasure Zones: Bodies, Cities, Spaces (Syracuse University Press). He is also the co-editor of Cosmopolitan Urbanism (Routledge) and special issues of Political Geography, Social and Cultural Geography and Environment and Planning A.

  • Arjen de Wit has worked as project manager for the Lusatian Lakeland for the Internationale Bauausstellung (IBA) Fürst-Pückler-Land in Germany since 2008. He graduated as a regional planner at Wageningen University in 2006 and subsequently worked as a researcher at Wageningen University for the chair groups Land Use Planning and Socio-spatial Analysis.

  • Tim Edensor teaches cultural geography at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is the author of Tourists at the Taj (1998), National Identity, Popular Culture and Everyday Life (2002) and Industrial Ruins: Space, Aesthetics and Materiality (2005); as well as the editor of Geographies of Rhythm (2010), co-editor of Spaces of Vernacular Creativity (2009) and Urban Theory Beyond the West: A World of Cities (2011). Tim has written extensively on national identity, tourism, industrial ruins, walking, driving, football cultures and urban materiality and is currently investigating landscapes of illumination.

  • Paul H. Gobster is Research Social Scientist with the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s Northern Research Station in Chicago, and the Editor of Landscape and Urban Planning. His current research examines people’s perceptions of natural area restoration and management, the interface between aesthetic and ecological values in landscape, and the design and provision of urban green spaces to encourage healthy lifestyles.

  • Maria Hellström Reimer is a visual artist with a PhD in landscape architecture, now holding a position as professor in Design Theory at the School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden. Her academic interests range from theoretical aesthetics and art activism to urban studies and design methodology. Current research includes the inter-disciplinary and arts-based project Land Use Poetics, an international collaboration around spatial practices, technologies and imaginaries. She is also affiliated with the Design Faculty, Royal College of Technology, Stockholm and a member of the Swedish Research Council’s Committee for Artistic Research.

  • Richard Keenan has spent the last nine years working on the communication of environmental and social issues both in marketing and communications and as an artist. He began working for a regional organisation in Yorkshire in 2002 and left to set up Environment Room Ltd in 2005. After five years as Director, he moved on from the company and is now focusing on creative projects that explore contemporary society.

  • Yichen Li holds an MA in Landscape Architecture from the Landscape Department of the University of Sheffield (2008–2010), in which he specialized in landscape planning and design, especially the regeneration of post-industrial landscapes. In 2010, as an assistant to the chief planner of the Shanghai Expo, he helped compile the publications entitled Planning of Expo 2010 Shanghai China and Landscape of Expo 2010 Shanghai China. He is currently an assistant landscape architect at Aedas Urban Design & Landscape Ltd, with the main emphasis on Landscape Design.

  • Steve Millington is a Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at Manchester Metropolitan University. His research interests include football and place identity, place marketing and branding, and the relationship between light, place and society, including Christmas lights and Blackpool Illuminations. Steve has published widely in international journals including Sociology and Environment and Planning A. He is also co-editor of two edited collections, Cosmopolitan Urbanism and Spaces of Vernacular Creativity (both published by Routledge). Steve is also a Fellow of the Institute of Place Management.

  • Katy Mugford believes that adventure, imagination and play are equally important for adults and children. She studied Art History at the University of York and Birkbeck College, London. She writes and paints.

  • Ian D. Rotherham, environmental geographer, ecologist and landscape historian, is a Reader in Tourism and Environmental Change, Professor of Environmental Geography, and International Research Coordinator at Sheffield Hallam University. He is an international authority on urban ecology and environmental history. He has researched and written extensively on the history and ecology of Yorkshire landscapes, and on urban and riverine ecologies and histories. His particular fascination is the transformation, often beyond recognition, of ancient landscapes by human activity. Ian’s work on this landscape change in relation to people and flooding has been very widely reported. He also writes and broadcasts on environmental issues.

  • Marian Tylecote was born in South Africa where she studied Fine Art before moving to England. She taught art and worked as a designer (mainly in advertising and textiles) before gaining a BSc in Landscape Design and Ecology in the Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield, UK, and thereafter an MA in Landscape Research and Planning at the same institution. She specializes in the application of ecology in designed urban landscapes (both in teaching and research) and is reading for a PhD focusing on ruderal perennial vegetation and competitive grassland.

  • Christopher Woodward is an art historian whose interest in ruins began when working at Sir John Soane’s Museum. He was Director of the Holburne Museum of Art, Bath, until 2005, and is currently Director of the Garden Museum in London. His book In Ruins was published by Chatto & Windus in 2001, and short-listed for the Rhys Prize for young writers; it has subsequently been published in America, China, Japan and Italy. The essay in this book reflects his new interest in the ruins of modern cities – and, in particular, the new cult of the ruin in the United States.